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CSC & IT - Computer Science and Information Technology (WO)

Write

Once you have your sources, you can begin writing.  The Tutoring Center can help you:

  • Refine your thesis statement
  • Outline and organize
  • Write effectively

If you have questions about finding, evaluating, and citing sources, ask a librarian instead.

 

Cite

Quick Help:

In-depth help for more complex citations:

Citation basics:

Works Cited

The works cited page lists all of the sources you used.

Bukhari 5

Works Cited

Abara, Chidike and Joseph Buckland. “Consumer Attitudes Toward Electric Vehicles: Barriers to Wide-Scale Adoption." Journal of Consumer Psychology, vol. 116, no. 2, 2021, pp. 219-36. ProQuest.

Diaz, Bianca, et al. The Future of Electric Vehicles. 3rd ed., Greenhaven, 2021.

Nguyễn, Amy. “Busting Electric Vehicle Myths.” Green Technologies in Transportation, edited by Roman Espejo and Martha Kaplan, Gale, 2021, pp. 21-30.

"Your Next Car Should Be an Electric Vehicle.” Edmunds, 2021, www.edmunds.com/electric-car/.

In-Text Citations

In-text citations tell your professor which source you used at a specific point in the paper. 

Bukhari 1

Zulfi Bukhari

Professor Jennifer Richardson

ENG 111

22 October 2021

Persistent Myths Cause Lagging Electric Vehicle Sales

Electric vehicle technology has advanced dramatically in the past decade, yet EVs represented just 2% of auto sales in the US last year (Nguyễn 27).  Automakers have long since solved problems that plagued early electric vehicles, so why have consumers not embraced EVs?  The answer lies in public perception.  According to Abara and Buckland, many people believe that EVs are unreliable and cannot meet their everyday transportation needs (3).  When asked to guess the range of a few popular EV models, people consistently guessed less than half the actual range (Abara and Buckland 4).  One driver perfectly summarized why many consumers are apprehensive about buying an electric vehicle, saying that she needs a car that "can accelerate quickly, go over hills and drive at interstate speeds for my commute" (Diaz et al. 32).  EVs have faster acceleration than traditional gas-powered cars and can easily handle hills and interstate speeds ("Your Next Car").  Consumers seem to think that EVs are less powerful than gas cars, but this is false.  More automakers are committing to increased EV production, but consumer misperceptions must be overcome before we see wide-scale public buy-in.

 

In-depth help for more complex citations:

Reference List

The references page lists all of the sources you used.

6

References

Abara, C., & Buckland, J. A. (2021). Consumer attitudes toward electric vehicles: Barriers to wide-scale adoption. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 116(2), 219-36. doi: 10.1007/s11199-011-0089-z

Diaz, B., Al-Tahrawi, K., Makeba, M. (2021). The future of electric vehicles (3rd ed.). Greenhaven Press.

Nguyễn, A. H. (2021). Busting electric vehicle myths. In R. Espejo & M. Kaplan (Eds.), Green Technologies in Transportation (pp. 21-30). Greenhaven Press.

Your next car should be an electric vehicle. (2021, October 22). Edmunds. www.edmunds.com/electric-car/

In-Text Citations

In-text citations tell your professor which source you used at a specific point in the paper. 

2

Persistent Myths Cause Lagging Electric Vehicle Sales

Electric vehicle technology has advanced dramatically in the past decade, yet EVs represented just 2% of auto sales in the US last year (Nguyễn, 2021).  Automakers have long since solved problems that plagued early electric vehicles, so why have consumers not embraced EVs?  The answer lies in public perception.  According to Abara & Buckland (2021) , many people believe that EVs are unreliable and "cannot meet their everyday transportation needs" (p. 37).  When asked to guess the range of a few popular EV models, people consistently guessed less than half the actual range (Abara & Buckland, 2021).  One driver perfectly summarized why many consumers are apprehensive about buying an electric vehicle, saying that she needs a car that "can accelerate quickly, go over hills and drive at interstate speeds for my commute" (Diaz et al., 2021, p. 32).  EVs have faster acceleration than traditional gas-powered cars and can easily handle hills and interstate speeds (Your Next Car, 2021).  Consumers seem to think that EVs are less powerful than gas cars, but this is false.  More automakers are committing to increased EV production, but consumer misperceptions must be overcome before we see wide-scale public buy-in.

 

In Chicago Style, there are two (2) types of formatting choices. The Notes and Bibliography style, which utilizes footnotes and endnotes both for citing material and also to provide extra information should the author wish to, and the Author-Date style

Footnote Citations (Notes and Bibliography)

Citations for footnotes will differ depending on the type of resource you are citing. In general, CMS requires a full citation (like in your bibliography), with a few differences in your footnote. Differences include:

  • The author(s)'s name(s) will be listed as firstname lastname, rather than lastname, firstname like it is in the Bibliography. 
  • The publication information will be in parentheses.
  • There will be a comma after the publication information, with page numbers citing either your quote or the pages in which you found the information you're using.

Example: 

1. Barry Estabrook. Pig Tales: An Omnivore's Quest for Sustainable Meat. (New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2015), 15-25.

In some cases, it may be appropriate to use a shortened citation in a footnote. That would look like this

1. Estabrook, Pig Tales, 15-25.

In-Text or Parenthetical Citations (Author-Date)

In-text citations can also be used to tell your professor which source you used at a specific point in the paper.

These citations also correspond to the full citation found in the Reference List at the end of your paper.

Here are three examples of in-text citations:

  1. Use a signal phrase and a quote. A signal phrase introduces the author in a lead in a sentence with a quote, and then places the publication year and page number at the end.
    • Pollan explains that "the apple, like the settlers themselves, had to forsake its former domestic life and return to the wild before it could be reborn as an American"  (2001,13).
  2. Use a direct quote. A direct quote places the author, publication year and page number in parenthesis at the end.
    • "In effect, the apple like the settlers themselves, had to forsake its former domestic life and return to the wild before it could be reborn as an American" (Pollan, 2001, 13).
  3. Use a signal phrase and a paraphrase. A signal phrase introduces the author in the sentence, and rather than quote the author directly, you restate the author's ideas in your own words. This is followed by the publication year and page number in parenthesis.
    • Michael Pollan compares the apple to the settler, because both required an experience in the wild in order to fully express the American experience (2001, 13).

 

Reference List Citations

The reference list includes full citations all sources used in your paper. This should be organized alphabetically according to author last name. If your source has no author, use the first letter of the title. For the Notes and Bibliography style, this list of references will be called "Bibliography." If you are using the Author Date style, title your list "References" or "Works Cited." Note the difference in the following two examples of where the date is placed. 

Example: Bibliography (Notes and Bibliography Style)

Estabrook, Barry. Pig Tales: An Omnivore's Quest for Sustainable MeatNew York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2015.

Pollan, Michael. The Botany of Desire. New York: Random House, 2001.

Example: References (Author-Date Style)

Estabrook, Barry. 2015Pig Tales: An Omnivore's Quest for Sustainable Meat. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

Pollan, Michael. 2001The Botony of Desire. New York: Random House.