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How to identify fake news

How to fact check. Direct comments to pderoy@nvcc.edu

Seeing is NOT believing. It takes training to know when you are being scammed. This LibGuide covers some of the basics that will help you judge if something is true or fake.

If you have any doubt, check it out!

Facebook posts, twitter feeds, speeches, articles, pamphlets, memes, experts, videos - check them out for truthfulness. 

 Viral rumors........   misinformation..........    lies..........     scams....... hoaxes.......... trolling,............  fake news  ............      

click bait......fraud.... baloney...... are rampant today.

Welcome

Fake News

Hello and welcome! 
This research guide will help you develop what Carl Sagan in 1996 called

"The Baloney Detection Kit." *

                                                             use
                   QUICK LINKS on the right to see if a particular topic or news story 
                                                  has already been examined for truthfulness.

                  RESEARCH PROCESS tab for strategies for determining veracity.

                  WEBSITES links you to specific sites devoted to identifying fake news

                   VIDEOS  link to entertaining and informative videos on fake news

                   MODEL PROJECTS for a compilation of links to groups that are
                                                             devoted to truthfulness in news. 
                   GLOSSARY for definitions of  common terms used.

        


All images are in the public domain or under Creative Commons licenses.
Click any image for copyright information.

 * Baloney Detection Kit can be found in Sagan's book : " Demon-haunted world : science as a candle in the dark. "
                                                                                                          Call # Q175 .S215 1996 in NVCC libraries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

QUICK LINKS

Use the links below to do a quick check to see if someone else has already investigated a statement or story.  Use Who.Is to find out who owns a particular domain name. 

Need Help?

For individual research help, schedule an appointment to meet with a librarian.

Comments? Suggestions?

Have you found a great source for fact checking? Have you identified a broken link?

Direct your comments and suggestions to: Pderoy@nvcc.edu