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NOVA MLA Citation Style Guide   Tags: citation, mla  

This style guide will help you cite the most common types of materials required in research projects and papers. - Guide by Eliza Selander. Direct comments to eselander@nvcc.edu.
Last Updated: Oct 1, 2014 URL: http://libguides.nvcc.edu/MLACitationStyle Print Guide Email Alerts

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Using this MLA Guide

This guide was created to help you format your papers using the MLA citation style. A citation style tells you how your paper should be arranged, and how to give credit to resources such as books and articles both in the text of your paper, and in your works cited page.


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Find formatting and in-text citation help below.

 

Formatting Your MLA Paper

Information obtained from:

The Purdue OWL. Purdue U Writing Lab, 2010. Web. 12 July 2012.

 

In-Text Citations

Below are 3 ways that you can provide an in-text citation:

1. Use a signal phrase and a direct quotation. A signal phrase may introduce the author (first and last name for first mention) in a lead-in sentence with a direct quotation, and then place the page number in parenthesis at the end.

Ex.: Michael Pollan explains that "the apple, like the settlers themselves, had to forsake its former domestic life and return to the wild before it could be reborn as an American" (13).

2. Use a signal phrase and a direct quotation and then place the author's last name and the page number in parenthesis at the end (no comma goes between them).

Ex.: One writer explains that "the apple like the settlers themselves, had to forsake its former domestic life and return to the wild before it could be reborn as an American" (Pollan 13).

3. Use a signal phrase and a paraphrase to do the same as the two examples above, but without quotation marks, since you will restate the author's ideas in your own words. The use of paraphrase is considered an indirect quotation.

Ex.: Michael Pollan compares the apple to the settler, because both required an experience in the wild in order to fully express the American experience (13).

Ex.: One writer compares the apple to the settler, because both required an experience in the wild in order to fully express the American experience (Pollan 13).

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All of these in-text citations would correspond to a citation on your works cited page for:

Pollan, Michael. The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World . New York: Random House, 2001. Print.

 

Formatting Your Works Cited Page

MLA Works Cited Formatting

 

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Sample MLA Paper

Sample paper in MLA style, from Purdue's Online Writing Lab. 

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