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Citing Literary Works

Works Cited (Plays)

Play from a Book

(1) Author. Euripides.
(2) "Title of Source." Medea.
(3) Title of Container, The Complete Plays,
(4) Other contributors, translated by Jamar Green,
(5) Version,
(6) Number,
(7) Publisher, Penguin Books,
(8) Publication date, 2020,
(9) Location. pp. 120-157.

Putting it all together:

Euripides. Medea. The Complete Plays, translated by Jamar Green, Penguin Books, 2020, pp. 192-214.


Play from a Website

(1) Author. Euripides.
(2) "Title of Source." Medea.
(3) Title of Container, The Internet Classics Archive,
(4) Other contributors, translated by Edward Coleridge,
(5) Version,
(6) Number,
(7) Publisher, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
(8) Publication date, 2020,
(9) Location. classics.mit.edu/Euripides/medea.html.

Putting it all together:

Euripides. Medea. The Internet Classics Archive, translated by Edward Coleridge, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2020, classics.mit.edu/Euripides/medea.html.


Short Story Your Professor Posted on Canvas

(1) Author. Gilman, Charlotte Perkins.
(2) "Title of Source." Othello.
(3) Title of Container, Canvas,
(4) Other contributors, uploaded by LeeAnn Thomas,
(5) Version,
(6) Number,
(7) Publisher,
(8) Publication date, 10 Oct. 2020,
(9) Location. learn.vccs.edu.

Putting it all together:

Gilman, Charlotte Perkins. "The Yellow Wallpaper." Canvas, uploaded by LeeAnn Thomas, 10 Oct. 2020, learn.vccs.edu.

In-Text (Plays)

Keep quotes brief - ideally just a few words.  The purpose of quotes is to set up your analysis, so only quote what is necessary to make you point.  There are two ways to format quotes:

Brief Quotes Block Quotes
Length of Your Quote
  • 3 or fewer lines of poetry
  • 4 or more lines
How to Use Run brief quotes into the body of your paper and use in-text citations.

Use block quotes only when absolutely necessary, and be sure to provide extensive analysis if you do.

Write a sentence to introduce the block quote, and end the sentence with a colon instead of a period.

Indent 1/2" on the left margin.

Add an in-text citation at the end of the block quote, after the final punctuation.

Brief quotes are cleaner than block for play dialog.  If you must use a block quote, start each part of the dialog with the speaker's name in all capital letters, followed by a period, then the dialog.  Indent the first line by 1/2" and subsequent lines of that character's speech by slightly more.  Start a new line any time dialog shifts to another character.

Original

GONERIL

Hear me, my lord;
What need you five and twenty, ten, or five,
To follow in a house where twice so many
Have a command to tend you?

REGAN

What need one?

KING LEAR

O, reason not the need!

Brief Quote

When Regan asks, "What need one?," Lear responds in exasperation, "reason not the need!" (2.4.257-58)

Block Quote

Lear realizes his diminished power as he negotiates with his daughters to retain a rapidly diminishing number of personal knights, from 100 down to none:

GONERIL.  Hear me, my lord;
    What need you five and twenty, ten, or five,
    To follow in a house where twice so many
    Have a command to tend you?

REGAN.  What need one?

LEAR.  O, reason not the need! (2.4.253-58)